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the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
. this is "your money." the elections are over. the american people have spoken. now it's time for washington to get to work. >> you elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. >> that's because nothing is more important to our economic recovery than creating jobs. president obama says he'll add 12 million jobs over the next four years. but for his math to work, the pace of economic growth needs to pick up. with a crisis in europe and a slowdown in asia, an economic storm beyond our control stands ready to batter our shores. still, two years of consistent job growth prove we are heading in the right direction, but the fiscal cliff is one storm that will be of our own making unless washington acts. $7 trillion in across-the-board tax hikes and spending cuts over the next decade mandated to begin in january. it's the legislative equivalent of a slow motion train wreck that washington can avoid. the question? will congress and the president drive that train over a cliff? >> we won't solve the problem of our fiscal imbalance overnight. >> the elections are over. the threats to our economy are not
>> "inside washington" is brought to you in part by the federal association of employees, proud to make the gornment work. >> production assistants for "inside washington" provided by albritton communications and "politico." >> we have to pick ourselves up. we have fought our way back. and we know in our hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nion,ut then the networks called ohio a
>>> this morning on "meet the press" -- an unfolding scandal in washington. and a new battle over the fiscal cliff. the election celebration is short-lived. a surprise resignation by cia director david petraeus comes days before congressional hearings over the attack on th u.s. consulate in benghazi. we'll get reaction this morning from capitol hill and the very latest reporting on this developing story from our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell, who broke the story friday afternoon. also the president and republicans get set to negotiate new taxes and spending cuts. is a breakthrough possible? >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. we've debated over and over again. and on tuesday night we found out that the majority of americans agree with my approach. >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led. not as democrats or republicans but as americans. now, we want you to lead. >> where does it all go from sneer we'll ask democratic senator from new york chuck schumer and republican senator from oklahoma tom coburn. also we check in with cn
handle it, chris christie is much more adept at handling the problem than anybody in washington. >> so the jury is still out. and i'm saying this, this is a point i want to raiseith you, adam lashinsky, the knee jerk response, fema is doing a great job, how do you know? how do you know? i just find it offensive when officials who are supposed to be providing help so sure early on that they are. and that is, as these others were pointing out, you could go do aerial shots over staten island at some points looks like mogadishu. and the fact of the matter is, quite rightly we're all over administration officials when it looked like the response to katrina was delayed. and i don't believe we applied the same litmus test this time around, but it is what it . they have a test the responsiveness of agencies and not reward them with more money, before we know how successful. at this point i would say not suck'sful at all. >> hold on, i almost completely agree with you, neil. where i will give the elected officials the benefit of the doubt, they want to try to be hopeful, right? they want to try
a divided washington cuts a deal. we'll talk with four congressional leaders, who will play big roles in trying to find a compromise. republican senator bob corker, and congressman tom price. and democratic senator kent conrad and congressman chris van hollen. plus, president obama looks ahead to a second term, while republicans look to regroup. we'll ask our sunday panel about what both sides need to do, moving forward. all, right now, on fox news sunday. ♪ >> chris: and, hello, again, from fox news in washington. on veterans day. when we honor the military, for their service to our nation. and, sadly, we begin today with a dramatic fall from grace, of one of the most respected military men of this generation. cia director and retired four star general david petraeus stepped down friday after admitting to an extramarital affair. joining us to discuss that and upcoming hearings on the deadly terror attack in libya is the chairman of the senate intelligence committee, dianne feinstein, senator, welcome back to fox news sunday. >> thank you very much, chris. >> chris: in a statement f
that ist for us in washington. "fox news sunday" is next. senate committee chair dianne feinstein talks exclusively with chris wallace i'm shannon bream. thanks for watching. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> chris: i'm chris wallace. a personal scandal forces c.i.a. director david petraeus to resign. we'll discuss the startling end to a brilliant career and look ahead to congressional investigation of terror attack in benghazi, with the chairman of the senate intelligence committee dianne feinstein. a "fox news sunday" exclusive. then the new year will bring higher taxes and huge spending cuts. unless a divided washington cuts a deal. we'll talk with four congressional leaders who will play big roles in trying to find a compromise. republican senator bob corker and congressman tom price. democratic senator kent conrad and congressman chris van hollen. plus, president obama looks ahead to a second-term while republicans look to regroup. we'll ask our sunday panel about what both sides need to do moving forward. all right now. on "fox news sunday." and hello again fro
riley and washington columnist kim strassel. start with you, when you get a defeat like this, there's no one thing necessarily that explains it. but why don't you pick out your most important? >> look, i think there were two things key to the obama victory, one was that very ol on, they ran this very high dollar attack campaign against mitt romney, a bit of a character assassination throughout the summer and mitt romney didn't respond to it and he didn't recover from it. when you combine that with the president's brutally efficient, we now know turnout operation in core states like ohio, virginia and florida, popular vote pretty close in the end. in the end he got out the partisans in much the same numbers in 2008 and that's what won it for him. >> paul: so, kim, you're saying that's about 100 million dollars or more that the obama campaign poured on mitt romney on bain capital on his tax returns on the fact that he's a pluto kratt, and making him to be gordon gecko without the social-- and romney, would you agree they made a fatal mistake in not countering the attack ads? >> i thin
intelligence. >>> with washington still divided after tuesday's election k the president and congress find common ground on the fiscal cliff, immigration and other big issues. we'll ask our headliners, republican saxby chambliss and the senator responsible to adding to the democrat majority, senator patty murray. >>> representatives donna edwards and aaron schock, paul gigot, katrina vanden heuvel and greta van susteren. >>> hello, again. what a week in politics. with his victory in florida yesterday, president obama now has a sweep of the battlegrounds. 332 electoral votes. losing only indiana and north carolina from his 2008 total. the popular votes are still coming in. the president will come up about 8 million short of his 2008 tally. we'll discuss how obama did and what's next for the gop and the governing challenges ahead? >>> but first, that friday afternoon bombshell. david petraeus resigns at the cia after officials uncover his extramarital affair. . >> yes it came to light after a woman in tampa tied to military got a peculiar, harassing e-mail. she was so concerned, she contacte
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
can come up with. >> we need to bring it back into balance. >> molly, you covered washington. this is the fundmental issue we are talking about. it's an ase metric polarization. it's a political science. impeer cal way of trying to track where people are and where the caucuses are. the originator of this scoring system ran the new numbers. the 112th senate is on top and the 113th senate is on the bottom. there's not that nuch difference. both peaks narrowed. they cluster more around their caucuses. can the senate function under its current conditions of polarization on one hand and super majority on the other? >> not so far, right. in the last couple years, they haven't gotten a lot done. i think this argument about, you know, status quo versus a mandate for if not change something. it's interesting. it's like the republicans are making this argument that there was a mandate to do nothing because they do not want to see liberals take the ball and run with it. and accomplish a lot of their policy proposals or ideas. so -- but i think you see wiggle room. you do -- i mean every
, and we will talk about the economic policy implications of where we are. >> august returns to washington next week, and now we preview the commercial agenda in the land and the relationship with president obama. panelists include a former labor secretary elaine chao and president of the center for american progress, neera tanden. this is half an hour. >> see you again. all right. jared is over there. let me just real quickly -- elaine chao, now at the heritage foundation, is a former secretary of labor. alex brill, senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. neera tanden is the president of the center for american progress, formerly chief policy adviser for hillary clinton and a 2008 and 2016 -- sorry. [laughter] jared bernstein is a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities, former chief economic adviser to joe biden and in 2000 and 20 -- no, sorry. we should have separated you two, actually. >> today is a day for half the purpose of the families. >> -- happy progress of families. >> we have to start with the big question. obviously, we are in a position where
. he talked to kristen welker. she's in washington with more. >> i interviewed steven boylan by phone saturday. he called petraeus a mentor and friend. boylan says he's stunned by the news about his former boss. in the meantime, new details are emerging about how this all came to light. according to multiple sources, the down fall of general david petraeus all started with a seemingly unrelated complaint to the fbi. officials say it was triggered by e-mails from paula broadwell to another woman not related to petraeus who felt she was being harassed and complained to the fbi. officials say in recent weeks, the fb icht traced the e-mails to broadwell and only stumbled on the relationship with petraeus as a result. >> my first reaction was disbelief. >> reporter: steven boylan worked with petraeus from 2005 to 2008, including in iraq. the two have remained close and spoke by phone on saturday. >> he said he had an excellent job, an exceptional family, he had had a great relationship he thought with the white house. and in his words, he screwed up. and he knows it. >> reporter: officials
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
like the early 1950's. hi, i'm chris matthews. welcome to the show. with us today, the washington post bob woodward. "the washington post" kathleen parker, "the new york times" d helen cooper. first up. barack obama's place in american presidential history was upgrated tuesday with his convincing sweeping re-election by an entirely new american elect rat. -- electorate. >> we are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. and together, with your help and god's grace, we will continue our journey forward. chris: bob, here we are five days later. i'm thinking, i still can't absorb the months and months and months we worried about which way this election mibet go and then to see it go in one simple clear direction. obama's direction. >> and it's a big deal for him. and the interesting question is how is he going to use the power of the presidency? david wrote a really important column about linden johnson saying, what's the presidency for? doing big things. he
>>> the man and his mandate. mr. "hardball"! ♪ >>> good evening, i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the re-elected president did it today. he said what he's going to do. how he's going to lead. he's going to do it as a world leader entering into negotiations with conditions. those preconditions are clear. a tape back from the bush tax cuts from the top. this is it. it means people know we have a president now who's ready to stand his ground, for jobs, for growth, but not the bush/romney way. no more trickle down now that the people of this country have sent their message from the top up. he will be a democratic president. he will be fair on taxes. he will use those taxes to rebuild this country and educate it up to the tough competition we face in this 21st century. rock solid he is. backed again by a majority of the american people. indeed, re-elected as the only second democrat since the civil war with two majority elections. the other, of course, is fdr. with an updated mandate he is back. some ready to deal, others hiding in their bunkers, waiting for so
at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> tomorrow on "washington journal" with will talk about immigration reform by republicans and democrats and potential areas of compromise. our get is fawn johnson with "are national journal." followed by a look at the role of money in the 2012 election whofment spent it where and what roles super pacs played. we're joined by managing editor kathy kiely. and tax rates and what tax cuts are expected to expire at the end of the year. lindy paull is our guest. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. next former george w. bush national security adviser stephen hadley said getting america's house in order should be the country's top priority. he also spoke about the wars in iraq and afghanistan and how president obama may be forced to deal with iran. mr. hadley was part of the national security conference hosted by the world affairs council of america. it's about 35 minutes. >> thank you so much. good morning, everyone. welcome, steve. it's a real, real pleasure to have you here this morning. we're going to dive right in. i want to begin first by givi
, an agreement in the politica posturing and theater that is famous in washington. each side trying to very carefully dance off the cliff without looking like it produced the disaster. there is, in the president' remarks today and boehner's yesterday, the inkling of an overture on each side, now, how much of one? with 52 days left to go, how real? rich edson in washington reading between the lines. what do you think, rich? >> well, neil, there's plenty of space. the's not that many details discussed. neither side says they want to box the other in the corner beginning negotiations. president obama, though, made it fairly clear he wants taxes to go up on wealthier taxpayers saying after the election, he was r-elected, democrats back the senate, and the message in the campaign is wealthier people need to pay more. therefore, that's the approach he's taken. as for what happens in the3 negotiations a next year, we're still very, very early in this, and so we continue to move forward. what we heard from house speaker boehner, he'll talk revenue. unprompted the other say said we'll discuss revenu
on the day that we pay tribute to them. and women are on the way. washington will never be the same. but first, the president's lease on the white house has just been extended. just what is the mandate? >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. all week the democratic and republican political operatives and strategists have been sifting through exit polling data trying to piece together the how and why of president obama's reelection. poring over data of turnout and the racial and socioeconomic composition of the winning coalition and breakdowns of what issues drove the electorate to the polls, all the pundits and prognosticators were looking for the formula that added up to a win for the president. now, clearly nate silver has decoded the calculus of probability. but now the question shifted from who will win to what are the voters trying to tell us? and not even nate did definitively answer that. here's what we do know. voters turned out for president barack obama in droves. despite having a somewhat smaller electoral map than in 2008, this is one of the biggest democratic wins
washington, as we all edge closer to the so-called fiscal cliff, we'll ask two political insiders how we can break the pennsylvania avenue stalemate. and then later on on this veterans day, how dot men and women who served and sacrificed feel about how their issues played out on the campaign trail. first topping the political headlines on this sunday, lawmakers weighing in today on whether they can strike a deal to avoid sending the country over the looming fiscal cliff. democratic chuck schumer saying on nbc's "meet the press," it's time for republicans to agree to raise taxes on the wealthy. >> the president campaigned on letting the bush tax cuts expire on people above $250,000 income. the exit poll showed that 60% of the people agreed with it. >> but republican senator tom coburn also on "meet the press" indicating while the gop is on board with closing some tax loopholes, it is not sold on letting the bush tax cuts expire. >> we've had votes in the senate where we've actually gotten rid of tax credits. i think that's a given. and i think the vast majority of americans agree with that. t
today. >>> washington looks at old arguments through a post-election prism. and the sudden end of a distinguished career. >> today. can they hear each other now? >> we can't just cut our way to prosperity. >> feeding the growth of government through higher tax rates won't help us solve the problem. >> avoiding the fiscal cliff. the downfall of the cia chief and the remains of superstorm sandy. with new jersey senator bob menendez and new york congressman peter king. then dissecting tuesday's results with california governor jerry brown. plus, cnn's dana bash looks at the grand old party and the new electorate with a foursome of republicans. former presidential candidate jon huntsman, congresswoman cathy mcmorris-rodgers. former commerce secretary carlos gutierrez, and conservative activist gary bauer piem candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." >>> good morning from california. the state that led the tax cut revolution in the late '70s but this past tuesday voted to raise taxes. we'll talk to governor jerry brown later in the show. but first, that fiscal cliff. those t
, not a word we hear often in washington. if there is compromise to avoid this fiscal cliff, where does it come? john boehner indicated, revenue is possible, but we're not raising tax rates. where is there compromise? >> i think where there's going to be a compromise on taxes, this be would be a good thing on the economy, might exchange lower tax rates in return for a reduction in all the loopholes that as it is distort economic activity. so if boehner were able to achieve that kind of compromise, that's one that the republicans could be pleased with. the bush tax cuts are gone, they're expiring, and the president said that 250,000 below, he wants that extended, but for those making more than 250, will the bush tax cuts come to an end? >> i don't think so. i think actually the they won't come to an end because the democrats don't want major reduction in spending, if you hit the cliff, the spending would go down and politicians love to spend money. an extension of the bush tax cuts, less we're blessed by the relatively few, jeff baso, the late steve jobs, you want to remove the barriers to their
decided kind of individually. i read the numbers of the status crowe, but i think the those in washington is very different, that a rising republican tide was turned back. democrats are more firmly in control. lessons have been learned from the first four years, maybe. no more mr. nice guy. >> can you expand on that in the fiscal clip and some of the policies? >> i want to look ahead to the future. i do not have a good clear crystal ball here. i think these are all things to be determined. the barack obama reach out to republicans? starting with romney, but really the leadership and some of the key players whom he might be able to work with in a bipartisan way, say john mccain. there are house members and senators. does he reach out? secondly, legislation. does the government from the center out? does the governor from the base over to try to get a majority? on the republican side, how do they respond if obama reaches out? i think he will realize with the the test booklet facing us that he has to do something. how do republicans respond not have as much mcconnell responded? -- how do repu
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)

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